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The Mowbray Legacy - Photographs



Mowbray Castle


















Site of a Mowbray Castle at Owston Ferry, North Lincolnshire


This photograph of the motte (mound) where the keep of Sir Roger de Mowbray’s castle stood at Kinard Ferry (now Owston Ferry) was taken from the elevated churchyard; there is a steep drop over the church wall. The moat, or ditch, can still be seen in places, and the soil from there would have been piled up to make the motte. The castle was one of a number belonging to Roger destroyed as punishment for his rebellion against Henry II in the 1170’s. The beautiful church stands in the bailey (courtyard) of the old castle. Locally the motte is known as ‘Castle Hill’. Among the descendants of Roger, a crusader, are Queen Elizabeth II, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, George W. Bush, Diana, Princess of Wales and Audrey Hepburn.  

Photo © Marilyn Roberts



Mowbray Manor House


















The Site of the Mowbray Manor House beside St. Andrew’s Church, Epworth. © Marilyn Roberts



The church is known worldwide for its association with the Wesley family and it was here that John Wesley stood on his father Samuel’s tomb to preach when denied access to the building. A carved Mowbray lion, already hundreds of years old when John Wesley was born, can be found in the porch. The trees conceal the area now known as Vinegarth, the site of a great Mowbray residence and the place where Sir William de Mowbray, the Magna Carta baron, died in 1224; Thomas Mowbray, first Duke of Norfolk, was born here in March 1366.



Byland Abbey


















A Mowbray Foundation: Byland Abbey in  North Yorkshire. © Marilyn Roberts



The original was founded a few miles away in 1143 by Roger de Mowbray and his mother Gundred de Gournay; these newer buildings, also associated with them, date from 1177.



Byland Abbey Roger De Mowbray


















Byland Abbey, Burial Place of Roger De Mowbray? © Marilyn Roberts


The crusader Sir Roger de Mowbray and his mother are said to be buried here, although it is likely that Roger was buried in what is present day Lebanon. Joan Plantagenet, wife of John, 3rd Lord Mowbray, was buried before the altar here in 1349, a victim of the Black Death.




















Chasing Lady Mowbray' S Hood

The Main Players In The Haxey Hood Game, 6th January 2003: © Marilyn Roberts


The Lord of the Hood (Phil Coggan)


The Chief Boggin (Ian Dawes), holding the modern 'hood' – the original is said to have belonged to an early Lady Mowbray and was retrieved for her by peasants working in a muddy field after the wind blew it away. The game is played annually on Twelfth Night.


The Fool (Dale Smith)



Mowbray Lion Floor Tile


















Mowbray Lion Floor Tile Excavated from the Vinegarth Site, Epworth. © Marilyn Roberts



Mowbray Lion Window


















The Mowbray Lion, Holy Trinity Church, Goodramgate, York. © Marilyn Roberts by kind permission of the Churches’ Conservation Trust



In the stained glass the lion is white rather than silver. There are many associations with the Mowbrays and their contemporaries in nearby York Minster.



Mowbray Shield


















Mowbray Shield on the Post at Green Hill, Haxey. © Marilyn Roberts



 

Mowbray Lion


















The Mowbray Lion at Low Melwood. © Marilyn Roberts, by kind permission of Mr. R. Thornton


Carving on remains of the Carthusian Monastery, or Charterhouse, founded by Thomas Mowbray near Epworth in 1397. Augustine Webster, a prior here, was hanged, drawn and quartered in the reign of Henry VIII for refusing to recognise the king as the Supreme Head of the Church.




















The Tower of London - No Place for a Boy and His Mother. © Marilyn Roberts


Eleven-year-old John, 3rd Lord Mowbray and his terrified mother, the Lady Alina, were incarcerated here by Edward II.




Thomas Mowbray's Widow


















Thomas Mowbray's Widow, Elizabeth Fitzalan, and Sir Robert Goushill, Hoveringham Church. © Marilyn Roberts, by kind permission of the Churchwardens



Tomb effigies in St. Michael and All Angels, Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire. Elizabeth was Thomas Mowbray’s widow, and Sir Robert Goushill, his former retainer, was the third of her four husbands. Unfortunately, the tomb effigies have suffered with the passage of time. Elizabeth's father, Richard Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel was one of the richest Britons ever, having a fortune estimated at roughly £50 billion at today's rates (Times Rich List at the end of the Millennium); his son-in-law Thomas Mowbray was instrumental in his arrest and execution at the age of 51. Through her daughters Joan and Elizabeth Goushill, Elizabeth Fitzalan is an ancestor of Sir Winston Churchill and U.S. Presidents James Madison, Zachary Taylor, George W. Bush and Franklin D. Roosevelt, among others, while Anne Boleyn, Queen Elizabeth I, Lady Jane Grey, Sarah Ferguson and Audrey Hepburn can be counted with the descendants of her daughters Margaret and Isabel Mowbray.



Lady Anne Mowbray’s Grandfather


















Lady Anne Mowbray’s Grandfather - John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury. © Marilyn Roberts by kind permission of St. Mary’s Church, Warwick



Seen here in the garb of a mourning figure, or ‘weeper’ on the tomb of his father-in-law, Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick. Talbot's daughter, Elizabeth, married the last Mowbray Duke of Norfolk.



Richard Neville, ‘Warwick the Kingmaker’


















Richard Neville, ‘Warwick the Kingmaker’. © Marilyn Roberts by kind permission of St. Mary’s Church, Warwick


The power and influence of the Mowbrays were eclipsed somewhat by the prolific Neville family during the Wars of the Roses .


Richard Neville, who became Earl of Warwick, was another of Beauchamp’s sons-in-law. His daughter, Anne Neville, married Richard III.



A Mowbray and a Howard


















A Mowbray and a Howard - Elizabeth Talbot and Elizabeth Tilney. © Marilyn Roberts by kind permission of Rev. Ian M. G. Friars, Long Melford Church, Suffolk


Elizabeth Talbot, Duchess of Norfolk, (left) was the mother of Lady Anne Mowbray, making her the mother-in-law of the younger of the Princes in the Tower. Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey, was the wife of Margaret Mowbray's grandson, Thomas Howard, but died before her husband became Second Duke of Norfolk. Anne Boleyn was her granddaughter, as was Katherine Howard; both girls married Henry VIII and both were beheaded by him.




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Complete list of photographs from The Mowbray Legacy:



ARMS OF THE BISHOP OF DURHAM

Reproduced by kind permission of Durham County Council. © Durham County Council


BAMBURGH CASTLE, NORTHUMBERLAND

A stronghold of Robert de Mowbray, whose wife was forced to surrender it.


MAGNA CARTA PUBLIC HOUSE SIGN IN LINCOLN.

One of only four remaining copies of the original Magna Carta of 1215 can be seen at Lincoln Castle a few yards away.


BYLAND ABBEY, NORTH YORKSHIRE

The original was founded a few miles away in 1143 by Roger de Mowbray and his mother Gundred de Gournay; these buildings date from 1177.


KINARD CASTLE MOTTE, OWSTON FERRY

This photograph of the motte (mound) where the keep of Roger de Mowbray’s castle stood, was taken from the elevated churchyard; there is a drop over the wall. The moat, or ditch, can still be seen in places, and the soil from there would have been piled up to make the motte. The beautiful church stands in the bailey (courtyard) of the old castle. Locally the motte is known as ‘Castle Hill’.   


ST. ANDREW’S CHURCH EPWORTH AND THE SITE OF THE MOWBRAY MANOR HOUSE.

The church is known worldwide for its association with the Wesley family and it was here that John Wesley stood on his father’s tomb to preach when denied access to the building . The trees conceal the area known as the Vinegarth, the site of a great Mowbray residence and the place where William de Mowbray, the Magna Carta baron, died in 1224.


MOWBRAY LION

Holy Trinity Church, Goodramgate, York

Photo M. Roberts courtesy of the Churches' Conservation Trust


MOWBRAY LION FLOOR TILE EXCAVATED FROM THE VINEGARTH SITE, EPWORTH (detail).


GRIM REMINDER OF THE SCOTTISH CAMPAIGNS, SMITHFIELD, LONDON

Monument to William Wallace who was hanged, drawn and quartered in an area between St. Bartholomew’s Hospital (Bart’s) and the Church of St. Bartholomew the Great, both of which remain.


FOUNTAINS ABBEY, NORTH YORKSHIRE

Burial place of Roger, First Lord Mowbray; family members were benefactors for centuries.

Reproduced by kind permission of Harrogate International Centre. © Harrogate International Centre


ARMS OF HUGH LE DESPENSER THE ELDER; WINCHESTER GREAT HALL.

The Despensers, father and son, were responsible for the death of John, 2nd  Lord Mowbray in 1322.

Photo M. Roberts, by kind permission of Hampshire County Council


CLIFFORD’S TOWER YORK.

After the Battle of Boroughbridge Sir Roger de Clifford was hanged and his body suspended from the walls of the keep of York Castle; hence ‘Clifford’s Tower’.


LADY ALINA DE MOWBRAY

Alina de Braose was imprisoned in the Tower with her young son when her husband was hanged at York.

Photo courtesy of the City and County of Swansea . © City and County of Swansea


THE MAIN PLAYERS IN THE HAXEY HOOD GAME, 2003


LIVING PROOF THAT A FOOL CAN BECOME A LORD!

Stan Boor  was first the Fool, then Lord, of the Haxey Hood. Fortunately in World War II young lads like Stan and the older men of the villages kept the ancient tradition alive. This photograph from the 1970’s shows him with the late Peter Bee (the Fool, centre) and the late Arthur Clark (Chief Boggin).

Photo reproduced by kind permission of Mr. S. Boor


BYLAND ABBEY

Joan Plantagenet, Lady Mowbray, was buried before the altar here in 1349.


NO PLACE FOR A BOY AND HIS MOTHER

The Tower of London; John, 3rd Lord Mowbray and his mother the Lady Alina were incarcerated here by Edward II.


DURHAM CATHEDRAL

Durham monks prayed for an English victory at Neville’s Cross

Reproduced by kind permission of Durham County Council. © Durham County Council


HAXEY CHURCH: ‘THE CATHEDRAL OF THE ISLE’

The Mowbray Deed was kept here. The window on the right has a small Mowbray Lion. There is no trace of the original stained glass portrait of John de Mowbray.


THE MOWBRAY LION

Carving on remains of the Carthusian Monastery founded by Thomas Mowbray near Epworth.

Photo M. Roberts, by kind permission of Mr. R. Thornton


TOWER HILL

One of the memorial plaques to victims of the axe. Notice that it was not long before Richard Fitzalan followed his own ‘victim’ Sir Simon de Burley.


ELIZABETH FITZALAN AND SIR ROBERT GOUSHILL, HOVERINGHAM.

Tomb effigies in St. Michael and All Angels, Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire.

Photo. M. Roberts, by kind permission of the Churchwardens


LADY MARGARET BEAUFORT, MOTHER OF HENRY TUDOR

Image on the gatehouse of an Oxford college founded by her. Note the Tudor iconography – the ubiquitous rose and portcullis, the latter being one of Lady Margaret’s own badges.


MICKLEGATE BAR, YORK

Detail of one of the medieval gates (or bars) to the city. The heads of Richard of York and his young son Edmund were exhibited here on spikes.


THE MOWBRAY AND PERCY LIONS, HOLY TRINITY CHURCH, GOODRAMGATE, YORK

Mowbray on the right is the clearer image; in the glass the lion is white rather than silver, while the Percy lion is blue (azure). Thomas Mowbray Earl of Nottingham and Henry Percy (Shakespeare’s ‘Harry Hotspur’) perished in the rebellions against Henry IV.

Photo M. Roberts by kind permission of the Churches' Conservation Trust


RICHARD NEVILLE; ‘WARWICK THE KINGMAKER’

Neville is seen here in the garb of a mourning figure, or ‘weeper’ on the tomb of Richard Beauchamp, his father-in-law. His daughter Anne Neville married Richard III.

Photo M. Roberts by kind permission of St. Mary’s Church, Warwick


TOWTON, MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN; PALM SUNDAY 29th MARCH 1461

Site of the worst carnage of any battle fought on English soil; the arrival of John Mowbray, 3rd Duke of Norfolk and his men was said to have saved the day for the Yorkists.


ELIZABETH TALBOT, DUCHESS OF NORFOLK AND MOTHER OF LADY ANNE MOWBRAY

Wife of the last Mowbray Duke, Elizabeth was the daughter of Margaret Beauchamp who imprisoned Lady Isabel Mowbray.

Photo M. Roberts by kind permission of Rev. Ian M.G. Friars, Long Melford Church, Suffolk


JOHN TALBOT, EARL OF SHREWSBURY, LADY ANNE MOWBRAY'S GRANDFATHER.

Photo M. Roberts by kind permission of St. Mary’s Church, Warwick


THE TOMB OF RICHARD BEAUCHAMP, EARL OF WARWICK

One of the finest late medieval tombs in the country, it still retains the hearse over which a rich cloth would be draped when prayers were not being said for Beauchamp’s soul.

Photo M. Roberts by kind permission of St. Mary’s Church, Warwick


THE BEAUCHAMP TOMB

The great man’s son Henry and daughter-in-law, Cecilia Neville, lead the mourners depicted on the sides of the tomb.

Photo M. Roberts by kind permission of St. Mary’s Church, Warwick


THE LADIES OF THE BEAUCHAMP TOMB:

Cecilia Neville

Alice Montagu

Eleanor Beauchamp

Anne Neville

Margaret Beauchamp (Lady Anne Mowbray's grandmother)

Anne Beauchamp

Photos  M. Roberts by kind permission of St. Mary’s Church, Warwick


ELIZABETH TILNEY, Countess of Surrey

First Wife of the second Howard Duke and grandmother of both Anne Boleyn and Kathryn Howard

Photo M. Roberts by kind permission of Rev. Ian M.G. Friars, Long Melford Church, Suffolk


DOCUMENT OF THOMAS MOWBRAY, EARL OF NOTTINGHAM, from the Court Roll of the Manor of Crowle, 1392

“Memorandum that the reverend lord Lord Thomas de Mowbray, Earl Marshal and Nottingham, sent his venerable letters to dominus John de Shireburn, abbot of Selby, concerning granting the office of forester of the said abbot at Crowle to a certain valet of him the lord Earl, the tenor of which letter follows in these words…”

(Notice that the beginning of the fifth line Thomas Mowbray is called “lord of Mowbray and of Segrave…”.)

Reproduced by kind permission of Lincolnshire Archives. ©  Lincolnshire Archives


MOWBRAY SHIELD IN HAXEY VILLAGE


MOWBRAY LION FLOOR TILE FROM EPWORTH


THE MOWBRAY STONE Annotated drawing by Rawdon Brown  

At one time it was thought that the carved slab found in Venice might be  the lid of Thomas Mowbray's coffin.

Reproduced by kind permission of the Society of Genealogists, London. © Society of Genealogists


THE MOWBRAY STONE -detail

Reproduced by kind permission of the Society of Genealogists, London. © Society of Genealogists


All photographs ©  Marilyn Roberts unless otherwise stated

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